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Basic Ideas of Mathematical Epidemiology

  • Fred Brauer
  • Carlos Castillo-Chávez
Part of the Texts in Applied Mathematics book series (TAM, volume 40)

Abstract

The idea of invisible living creatures as agents of disease goes back at least to the writings of Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC). It developed as a theory in the 16th century. The existence of microorganisms was demonstrated by Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) with the aid of the first microscopes. The first expression of the germ theory of disease by Jacob Henle (1809–1885) came in 1840 and was developed by Robert Koch (1843–1910), Joseph Lister (1827–1912), and Louis Pasteur (1827–1875) in the latter part of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century.

Keywords

Endemic Equilibrium Total Population Size Infective Period Basic Reproductive Number Proportional Death Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Brauer
    • 1
  • Carlos Castillo-Chávez
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Dept. of Theoretical and Applied MechanicsMathematical and Theoretical Biology InstituteUSA
  3. 3.Biometrics DepartmentCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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