E-Health: Future Implications

  • Fred Peters
  • Michael Perry
  • Stephen O’Dell
  • David Pedersen
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

Beginning in 1969 with the introduction of ARPANET, parent to the Internet, the federal government and its agencies have pioneered the use of electronic interconnectivity to share information in more timely and efficient ways. Today, with society embracing e-commerce, Internet technologies have increasing potential to affect nearly every area of both public and private sector health care—an exciting and challenging prospect. Moving information and knowledge directly between caregiver and patient, between insured member and payor, and between regulatory agency and reporting organization poses remarkable possibilities for improved timeliness, accuracy, value, and effectiveness of information. This is the simple essence of e-health: it enables people to have greater participation in, knowledge about, and influence on their health, and it improves interactions with their health and wellness service providers.

Keywords

Government Sector Electronic Data Interchange Future Implication Enabling Technology Health Risk Appraisal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Readings

  1. DoD Electronic Business/Electronic Commerce Strategic Plan 1999. Policy letter signed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, DoD Senior Civilian Official Arthur L. Money, May 15.Google Scholar
  2. DoD CIO Guidance and Policy Memorandum No. 2–8190–031199, Defense wide: Electronic Business / Electronic Commerce. 1999. Policy letter signed by Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, DoD Senior Civilian Official Arthur L. Money, March 11.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Peters
  • Michael Perry
  • Stephen O’Dell
  • David Pedersen

There are no affiliations available

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