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Spinal Disorders and Nerve Compression Syndromes

  • Jonathan D. Lewin
  • John Olsewski

Abstract

Spinal disorders and nerve compression syndromes of the elderly are common presenting complaints to both internist and surgeons. In fact, approximately 70% of all patients seeking medical attention have the complaint of back pain at one time in their life. More than 13% have pain lasting more than 2 weeks.1 A directed history and physical examination and working knowledge of the spinal bony and neural anatomy are key elements for appropriate diagnosis and management. This chapter defines the major disorders affecting the geriatric population and guides the surgeon in the diagnosis and treatment options for each disorder.

Keywords

Cervical Spine Vertebral Body Nerve Root Spinal Stenosis Lumbar Spinal Stenosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan D. Lewin
  • John Olsewski

There are no affiliations available

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