Catholic High Schools and Homework

  • William Sander
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the effect of Catholic schools on homework. Studies indicate that homework has a relatively large effect on academic achievement (Betts, 1997; Walberg, 1991). Further, studies on Catholic schools suggest that higher levels of achievement in the Catholic school sector are possibly a result of more homework assigned in Catholic schools (Coleman, Hoffer, and Kilgore, 1982; Coleman and Hoffer, 1987). Other explanations for favorable Catholic school effects include focusing on a core curriculum, less bureaucracy, more discipline, the communal nature of Catholic education, peer group effects, and decentralization (Bryk, Lee, and Holland, 1993; Coleman, Hoffer, and Kilgore, 1982; Coleman and Hoffer, 1987). Further, Chubb and Moe (1990) argue that private schools are better than public schools because they have more autonomy. This chapter also considers the effect of homework and Catholic schools on test scores.

Keywords

Test Score Private School Minority Student White Student Catholic School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Sander
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsDePaul UniversityChicagoUSA

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