High Speed Resist Exposure With a Single Tip

  • Hyongsok T. Soh
  • Kathryn Wilder Guarini
  • Calvin F. Quate
Part of the Microsystems book series (MICT, volume 7)

Abstract

We have shown that current-controlled scanning probe lithography (SPL) can reliably pattern nanometer-scale features in resist. However, the serial nature of SPL makes it much slower than mask-based techniques such as photolithography, x-ray lithography, or extreme ultraviolet lithography. An advantage of a direct write approach is that it does not require expensive and time-consuming mask fabrication. SPL may also have superior alignment capabilities. Nevertheless, in order for SPL to become a viable technology for high-resolution semiconductor lithography, the throughput must be dramatically increased.

Keywords

Etch Rate Voltage Ramp Current Feedback Capacitance Compensation Compensation Circuit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyongsok T. Soh
    • 1
  • Kathryn Wilder Guarini
    • 1
  • Calvin F. Quate
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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