Portfolio Diversification, Leverage, and Financial Contagion

  • Garry J. Schinasi
  • R. Todd Smith

Abstract

The Mexican peso crisis that began in late 1994 was an adverse shock not just to Mexico, but also to several Latin American countries and to other countries around the world. Likewise, the financial consequences of the collapse of the Thai baht in 1997 and the unilateral debt restructuring by Russia in 1998 were far-reaching and created turbulence in even the largest and most developed capital markets in the world. These recent episodes of market turbulence have generated interest in why and how local financial events can affect market dynamics and cause turbulence in other countries’ financial markets. Several models of financial contagion have been developed that can explain why investors might sell many risky assets when an adverse shock affects just one asset. These models associate financial contagion with market imperfections — most often asymmetric information.

Keywords

Optimal Portfolio Risky Asset Asset Return Sharpe Ratio Leverage Ratio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garry J. Schinasi
    • 1
  • R. Todd Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.International Monetary FundCanada
  2. 2.International Monetary Fund and University of AlbertaCanada

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