The Health of Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

  • Bruce W. Goldberg
  • Marie Napolitano

Abstract

The agricultural industry is among the most vital and strategic industries in the United States. Net farm income in 1998 was estimated at $48 billion and agriculture remains at the economic and cultural foundation of most rural communities (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1999). It is a critical component of the U.S. economy and helps support and sustain the American lifestyle. Our highly productive system for growing, processing, and distributing agricultural products allows Americans to enjoy a consistent supply of fruits and vegetables that are readily available in our grocery stores and markets. The foundation of the agricultural industry and of many rural communities is the farmworker.

Keywords

Farm Worker Pesticide Exposure Migrant Health General Account Office Migrant Farm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce W. Goldberg
    • 1
  • Marie Napolitano
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineOregon Health Sciences University School of MedicinePortlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Primary CareOregon Health Sciences University School of NursingPortlandUSA

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