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No Safe Place to Hide

Rural Family Violence
  • Susan Murty

Abstract

People in the United States who choose to live in urban or suburban environments retain nostalgic and rosy views of rural life. They imagine small towns and rural areas as places where neighbors are friendly and helpful, where families are close and caring, and where children can grow up without witnessing violence. Unfortunately, although rural communities have many postive characteristics, they are not immune to the types of violence that threaten the peace of urban and suburban communities. In particular, family violence is a serious problem in rural areas just as it is in urban areas. This chapter examines the problems of spouse abuse, child abuse, and elder abuse in rural areas, and the rural services available for families who are affected by these types of violence. The emphasis of the chapter is on spouse abuse and violence against women, but the occurrence of the other forms of family violence is discussed as they relate to the overall theme of family violence.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Child Abuse Rural Community Intimate Partner Family Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Murty
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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