The Role of National Agricultural Research Systems in Providing Biotechnology Access to the Poor: Grassroots for an Ivory Tower?

  • Willem Janssen
  • Cesar Falconi
  • John Komen
Chapter

Abstract

This paper reviews the role of national agricultural research systems (NARSs) in providing biotechnology access to the poor and examines the possibilities for enhancing this role. Recent surveys in different developing countries suggest that the share of biotechnology research in total agricultural research increased in recent years. However, the overall biotechnology capacity is still far below that of developed countries. Furthermore, biotechnology is often associated with upstream strategic research, and there is the risk that this will always remain within the “ivory tower”. NARSs facilitate biotechnology access to the poor by supporting the development of an adequate regulatory framework and by undertaking research. Integrating biotechnology in problem-oriented, multidisciplinary research — where possible in collaboration with private-sector companies — is the best way to reach the poor. Five strategic activities are proposed to enhance the role of NARSs: priority setting, policy development, research management capacity development, technology transfer and international collaboration.

Keywords

Private Sector Agricultural Research Poverty Alleviation Agricultural Biotechnology Biotechnology Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Willem Janssen
  • Cesar Falconi
  • John Komen

There are no affiliations available

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