A Fully Polynomial Approximation Scheme for the Euclidean Steiner Augmentation Problem

  • J. Scott Provan
Part of the Combinatorial Optimization book series (COOP, volume 6)

Abstract

The Euclidean Steiner Augmentation Problem has as input a set of straight line segments drawn in the Euclidean plane, and has as output the smallest set of straight line segments, in terms of total Euclidean length, whose addition will make the resulting set 2-edge connected. A fully polynomial approximation scheme is given for this problem in the case where the input set is connected. Several extensions and variants are also discussed.

Keywords

Straight Line Segment Steiner Point Survivable Network Steiner Tree Problem Steiner Minimal Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Scott Provan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Operations ResearchUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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