Laser Angioplasty

  • Warren S. Grundfest

Abstract

During the early and mid-1980s multiple investigators applied various forms of laser energy in an attempt to recanalize vessels.1–3 These efforts focused on the use of laser energy to remove atherosclerotic obstructions in an attempt to improve on the limitations of balloon angioplasty. As balloon angioplasty and guidewire techniques improved, and as other devices assisted in recanalization and maintenance of patency, the criteria for measuring the success of laser angioplasty became more stringent. The combination of guidewires, balloons, and stents can now treat most stenoses and short occlusions (less than 3 cm) in peripheral vessels. Highly eccentric lesions can be treated with directional atherectomy catheters, and patency rates can be improved with the use of stents. Thus, as other techniques improved the physician’s ability to treat peripheral vascular occlusive disease with percutaneous techniques, the perceived need for laser angioplasty diminished.

Keywords

Excimer Laser Balloon Angioplasty Superficial Femoral Artery Ablation Threshold Laser Angioplasty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Warren S. Grundfest

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