Behavioral Pharmacology of Opiates

  • James P. Zacny
  • Ellen A. Walker
Chapter

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe and discuss what is currently known about the behavioral pharmacology of opioids in infra-humans and humans. This is a daunting task, given the breadth and depth of research that has been conducted during the past 50 years. Several reviews on the behavioral pharmacology of opioids cover certain areas in much greater detail than what can be covered here; the reader is encouraged to refer to these reviews, some of which appear yearly as an “update” (see Appendix for review bibliography).*

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Conditioned Place Preference Discriminative Stimulus Stimulus Effect Subjective Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • James P. Zacny
    • 1
  • Ellen A. Walker
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesia and Critical CareThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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