Behavioral Pharmacology of Hallucinogens

  • Nancy K. Morrison
Chapter

Abstract

All classic hallucinogens produce unique subjective effects on the basic functions of the human mind: perception, affect, cognition, volition, and interoception. Despite these usually profound effects, the individual retains contact with reality and memory during the altered state. Subtle differences are ascribed to particular compounds, although their subjective effects are more alike than different. These subjective effects account for the use of hallucinogens in established rituals of some cultures as well as the use and abuse of them in contemporary Western culture. Hallucinogens differ from other drugs of abuse in that tolerance develops rapidly and there is no physical dependence. The unique and profound effect on cognitive processes makes the hallucinogens valuable in neuroscientific research, and the discovery of LSD’s psychotropic effects, as much as the contemporaneous discovery of chlorpromazine, mark the beginning of modern biological psychiatry (Strassman, 1995).

Keywords

Drug Abuse Subjective Effect Borderline Personality Disorder Mystical Experience National Household Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy K. Morrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryThe University of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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