Pharmacology of Hallucinogens

  • Richard A. Glennon
Chapter

Abstract

What constitutes a hallucinogenic agent; what is the definition of hallucinogenic What effects are commonly produced by hallucinogens? How are hallucinogenic agents classified? Chemically, what are the structural requirements for hallucinogenic activity? How do hallucinogenic agents work? Interestingly, and perhaps counterintuitively, these questions are roughly listed in descending order of difficulty. Actually, there is more agreement today on how hallucinogens work than on a definition of the term hallucinogen.

Keywords

Discriminative Stimulus Stimulus Effect Receptor Affinity Drug Discrimination Trained Animal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Glennon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicinal ChemistryVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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