Reintroduction of Rare Plants: Genetics, Demography, and the Role of Ex Situ Conservation Methods

  • Edward O. GuerrantJr.
  • Bruce M. Pavlik
Chapter

Abstract

Many endangered plant species have been reduced to so few populations and such low numbers that timely collection and storage of seed has become imperative. If donor populations become extinct or seriously depleted, then off-site, or ex situ, samples can be used to reintroduce or augment populations in the wild. The strategic value of an ex situ component for plant conservation has been articulated by Falk (1987, 1990, 1992), who also helped establish the Center for Plant Conservation (CPC). The CPC is a national network of botanic gardens and arboreta that is attempting to assemble a genetically representative collection of our nation’s most rare and endangered plants while it is still possible to do so.

Keywords

Seed Bank Conservation Biology Population Biology Rare Plant Endangered Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward O. GuerrantJr.
  • Bruce M. Pavlik

There are no affiliations available

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