Manufacturing Strategy Put in Socio-Economic Context

  • Per Lindberg
  • Christopher A. Voss
  • Kathryn L. Blackmon
Chapter

Abstract

Explaining and modelling manufacturing strategy has traditionally—and correctly—been done in the context of internationalisation (Dunning, 1988), the business (Hill, 1985) and, more specifically, the products produced and the markets served (Hayes and Wheelwright, 1984). The logic in manufacturing strategy development is to link the way in which the firm competes through its products in the market to the design of the manufacturing system—its facilities, processes and organisational arrangements.

Keywords

Supply Chain Foreign Direct Investment Lean Production Manufacture Strategy Flexible Automation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Dunning, J.H. (1988) Explaining International Production,Harper CollinsGoogle Scholar
  2. Hayes, R.H. and Wheelwright, S.C. (1984) Restoring our Competitive Edge — Competing Through Manufacturing,Wiley & SonsGoogle Scholar
  3. Hill, T. (1985) Manufacturing Strategy,McMillanGoogle Scholar
  4. Hofstede, G. (1991) Cultures and Organizations,McGraw-HillGoogle Scholar
  5. Lillrank, P. (1995) ‘The Transfer of Management Innovations from Japan’, Organisation Studies, 16, 6CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Lindberg
    • 1
  • Christopher A. Voss
    • 2
  • Kathryn L. Blackmon
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Operations ManagementChalmers UniversityGoteborgSweden
  2. 2.Centre for Operations ManagementLondon Business SchoolLondonEngland

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