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Trajectories of Change

  • Per Lindberg
  • Christopher A. Voss
  • Kathryn L. Blackmon
Chapter

Abstract

Any company that is striving to improve its manufacturing operations must over the longer term make improvements and investments in both the organisation for manufacturing and the systems and technology that are required. However, for any firm there is a limit to the amount of change that an organisation can manage or cope with at any one time. Given this, an organisation must make choices as to what improvement and change activities to invest in, and what to delay. Over time, the issue becomes one of sequence, and the sequence chosen can be represented as a trajectory.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Organisational Change Mass Customisation Technological Investment Lean Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Ferdows, K. and De Meyer, A. (1990) ‘Lasting improvements in manufacturing: in search of a new theory’, Journal of Operations Management, 9, 2, 168–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Oliver, N., Delbridge, R., and Lowe, J. (1996) ‘Lean Production Practices: International Comparisons in the Auto Components Industry’, British Journal of Management, 7, March, S29–S44.Google Scholar
  3. Voss, C.A., Blackmon, K., Hanson, P. and Oak, B. (1995) ‘Competitiveness of European Manufacturing’, Business Strategy Review, 6, 1, 1–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Lindberg
    • 1
  • Christopher A. Voss
    • 2
  • Kathryn L. Blackmon
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Operations ManagementChalmers UniversityGoteborgSweden
  2. 2.Centre for Operations ManagementLondon Business SchoolLondonEngland

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