Phylogeny of trace metal accumulation in crustaceans

  • Philip S. Rainbow
Chapter

Abstract

Invertebrates accumulate trace metals in their tissues whether or not these trace metals are essential to their metabolism. Different invertebrates accumulate different trace metals to different degrees and accumulated concentrations vary greatly at tissue, organ and body levels (Eisler, 1981; Depledge and Rainbow, 1990; Rainbow, 1990a, 1993; Rainbow et al., 1990; Phillips and Rainbow, 1993; Chapter 8). Whether an accumulated concentration is high or low, therefore, cannot be assessed on an absolute scale, but the significance of an accumulated concentration depends greatly on the specific tissue and the specific invertebrate (Rainbow, 1987,1988, 1990a, 1993, 1996; Dallinger, 1993). To take one taxon as an example, tissue and body concentrations of trace metals vary greatly in crustaceans, even in the absence of anthropogenic input of trace metal contaminants (Bryan, 1968, 1976; Moore and Rainbow, 1987; Rainbow, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990a,b, 1993; White and Rainbow, 1987; Ridout et al., 1989). Table 9.1 highlights this interspecific variation in the body concentrations of zinc, copper and cadmium in crustaceans collected from clean and metal-contaminated sites.

Keywords

Trace Metal Marine Ecology Progress Series Shore Crab Body Concentration Marine Biological Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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