The Geography of Male and Female Genital Mutilations

  • James DeMeo
Chapter

Abstract

The desire by adults to attack the genitals of their infants and young children with sharp knives is a subject about which a tremendous amount has been written, the majority of which attempts to justify and “explain” it, but in a manner which leaves the larger cultural-social backdrop uncriticized. This paper will take a different approach, not only to criticize that “backdrop” but to lift it up, and get a good look at what’s going on “behind the curtain” of this deeply emotional and brutal human drama. Genital mutilations were originally studied by the author as part of a larger investigation of the geographical and cross-cultural aspects of human behavior among subsistence-level, aboriginal peoples.1–3 The focus in this paper will be restricted mainly to the phenomenon of male and female genital mutilations, but the larger cross-cultural and psychological-emotional aspects will be exposed and discussed as well.

Keywords

Geography Department Male Circumcision Female Genital Mutilation Sexual Pleasure International Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • James DeMeo

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