Preventing the Negative Effects of Common Stressors

Current Status and Future Directions
  • Mark W. Roosa
  • Sharlene A. Wolchik
  • Irwin N. Sandler
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The prevention research cycle has been described in many ways (e.g., Bloom, 1979; Coie et al., 1993; Cowen, 1982; Heller, Price, & Sher, 1980; Mrazek & Haggerty, 1994; Price, 1983, 1987; Price & Lorion, 1989; Sandler, Gersten, Reynolds, Kallgren, & Ramirez, 1988). Most of these approaches to prevention research include: (1) a generative stage in which researchers seek to develop a theory of the causal processes that place a particular group of children at heightened risk of adverse developmental outcomes; (2) a program development stage in which behavior change technology is utilized to design programs to change putative causal processes identified in the theory; (3) a field trial stage in which experimental trials are used to test whether the programs are effective in changing the putative causal processes and the targeted outcomes; and (4) an innovation diffusion stage in which a standardized program is implemented on a large scale in a wide range of naturalistic community settings (see Fig. 1).

Keywords

Preventive Intervention Stressful Life Event Developmental Outcome Teenage Pregnancy Stress Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark W. Roosa
    • 1
  • Sharlene A. Wolchik
    • 2
  • Irwin N. Sandler
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family Resources and Human Development and Program for Prevention ResearchArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology and Program for Prevention ResearchArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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