Cereals pp 159-167 | Cite as

Food and Non-Food Uses of Immature Cereals

  • Rolf Carlsson
Chapter

Abstract

In the past the aim of agriculture has been primarily to produce more and better food. However, during the last decade, production of industrial (non-food) raw materials from crops has been strongly advocated (Carlsson, 1995). The two demands for food and non-food materials require optimal utilisation of every potential source of plants and lands (Carlsson, 1994). Both dry crop and green crop fractionation of cereals have been developed for multipurpose uses for the food and non-food industries.

Keywords

Leaf Protein Crop Processing Rubisco Protein Fractionation Technology Green Crop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf Carlsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Natural SciencesKalmar UniversityKalmarSweden

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