Two-Dimensional Wave Equations and Wave Characteristics

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

A practicing coastal engineer must have a basic and relatively easy to use theory that defines the important characteristics of two-dimensional waves. This theory is required in order to analyze changes in the characteristics of a wave as it propagates from the deep sea to the shore. Also, this theory will be used as a building block to describe more complex sea wave spectra. Such a theory—the small amplitude wave theory—is presented in this chapter along with related material needed to adequately describe the characteristics and behavior of twodimensional waves.

Keywords

Wave Height Wave Period Wave Characteristic Wave Crest Surf Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adeyemo, M.D. (1968), “Effect of Beach Slope and Shoaling on Wave Asymmetry,” in Proceedings, 11 th Conference on Coastal Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers, London, pp. 145–172.Google Scholar
  2. Airy, G.B. (1845), “On Tides and Waves,” in Encyclopedia Metropolitan, London, pp. 241–396.Google Scholar
  3. Battjes, J.A. (1970), Discussion of “The Runup of Waves on Sloping Faces—A Review of the Present State of Knowledge,” by N.B. Webber and G.N. Bullock, Proceedings, Conference on Wave Dynamics in Civil Engineering, John Wiley, New York, pp. 293–314.Google Scholar
  4. Dean, R.G. and Dalrymple, R.A. (1984), Water Wave Mechanics for Engineers and Scientists, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.Google Scholar
  5. Douglass, S.L. (1990), “Influence of Wind on Breaking Waves,” Journal, Waterways, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, November, pp. 651–663 .Google Scholar
  6. Eagleson, P.S. (1956), “Properties of Shoaling Waves by Theory and Experiment,” Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 37, pp. 565–572.Google Scholar
  7. Goda, Y. (1970), “A Synthesis of Breaker Indices,” Transactions, Japan Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 2, Tokyo, pp. 227–230.Google Scholar
  8. Ippen, A.T. (1966), Estuary and Coastline Hydrodynamics, McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  9. LeMehaute, B., Divoky, D., and Lin, A. (1968), “Shallow Water Waves: A Comparison of Theories and Experiments,” in Proceedings, 11 th Conference on Coastal Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers, London, pp. 86–107.Google Scholar
  10. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. and Stewart, R.W. (1964), “Radiation Stress in Water Waves: A Physical Discussion, with Applications,” Deep Sea Research, Vol. 11, pp. 529–549.Google Scholar
  11. Miche, M. (1944), “Movements Ondulatoires des Mers en Profondeur Constante ou Decroissante,” Annales des Ponts et Chaussees, pp. 25–78, 131–164, 270–292, 369–406.Google Scholar
  12. Saville, T., Jr. (1961), “Experimental Determination of Wave Setup,” in Proceedings, 2nd Conference on Hurricanes, U.S. Department of Commerce National Hurricane Project, Report 50, pp. 242–252.Google Scholar
  13. Smith, E.R. and Kraus, N.C. (1991), “Laboratory Study of Wave Breaking Over Bars and Artificial Reefs,” Journal, Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, July/August, pp. 307–325.Google Scholar
  14. Sorensen, R.M. (1978), Basic Coastal Engineering, John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  15. Sorensen, R.M. (1993), Basic Wave Mechanics for Coastal and Ocean Engineers, John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  16. U.S. Army Coastal Engineering Research Center (1984), Shore Protection Manual, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  17. Weggel, J.R. (1972), “Maximum Breaker Height,” Journal, Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, November, pp. 529–548.Google Scholar
  18. Wiegel, R.L. (1950), “Experimental Study of Surface Waves in Shoaling Water,” Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 31, pp. 377–385.Google Scholar
  19. Wiegel, R.L. (1964), Oceanographical Engineering, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

Personalised recommendations