Ordering: Human versus Computer

  • Alfred Norman
  • Greg Leonard
  • Leigh Linden
  • Kara Meythaler
  • Kim Murray
  • Herb Newhouse
  • Nancy Tantzen
  • Michael Ziegler
Part of the Advances in Computational Economics book series (AICE, volume 6)

Abstract

Binary comparison operators form the basis of consumer set theory. When finding the preferred item from a set, humans frequently use a binary comparison operator. If humans could only perform binary comparisons, however, then any procedure a human might employ to make a complete preference ordering of n items would be bound from below in both cost and time by O(n log2, n). Experimental evidence indicates that humans are capable of implementing a linear algorithm for small sets. This indicates that humans have an ordinal utility function.

Keywords

Sorting Algorithm Information Operator Linear Algorithm Prefer Item Binary Comparison 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfred Norman
  • Greg Leonard
  • Leigh Linden
  • Kara Meythaler
  • Kim Murray
  • Herb Newhouse
  • Nancy Tantzen
  • Michael Ziegler

There are no affiliations available

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