Atopic Dermatitis

  • Stacie M. Jones
  • A. Wesley BurksJr.
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex, multifactorial disorder that was first described in the medical literature over 100 years ago. Although clinicians and researchers agree that this disorder is caused by many factors, the role of allergic disease has remained at the forefront of clinical research. In the late 19th century, Besnier provided a detailed description of a chronic, pruritic dermatitis beginning in infancy and showing associations with asthma and rhinitis. The term “prurigo Besnier” was subsequently used to describe these patients. In 1902, Brocq coined the term “neurodermatitis” to refer to a chronic, pruritic skin condition seen in patients with apparent nervous disorders. Coca (1933) was the first to denote the familial occurrence of hay fever, asthma, and eczema, and introduced the term “atopy” to describe the inherited nature of human hypersensitivity disorders. In 1933, Wise and Sulzberger condensed the past terminology into the descriptive term we use today— “atopic dermatitis.”

Keywords

Atopic Dermatitis Allergic Rhinitis Food Allergen Atopic Disease Food Challenge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Hanafin JM. Atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1984; 73: 211–222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hanafin JM. Atopic dermatitis. In: Middleton, Reed, Ellis, Adkinson, Yunginger, and Busse, eds. Allergy: Principles and Practice. St. Louis: Mosby-Yearbook, 1993, pp. 1581–1604.Google Scholar
  3. Leung DYM. Immunopathology of atopic dermatitis. Springer Semin Immunopathol 1992; 13: 427–440.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Sampson, HA. Pathogenesis of eczema. Clin and Exp Allergy 1990; 20: 459–467.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stacie M. Jones
  • A. Wesley BurksJr.

There are no affiliations available

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