Thymus

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

The thymus, along with the lower pair of parathyroid glands, is derived from the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches. The right and left halves of the gland fuse to form a pyramidal-shaped organ enclosed by a thin fibrous capsule. The thymus has a vital location adjacent to the important organs of the mediastinum. The gland usually sits in the anterosuperior portion of the mediastinum, with the base of the thymus sitting on the pericardium and the upper poles of each lobe extending superiorly into the neck.

Keywords

Parathyroid Gland Adjacent Structure Surgical Pathology Left Half Fibrous Capsule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Nezelof C. Thymic pathology in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. Histopathology. 1992; 21: 499–511.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Rosai J, Levine GD. Tumors of the Thymus. 2nd séries, fascicle 13. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 1976.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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