Lymph Nodes

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

High-quality sections for routine light microscopy are necessary, but not always sufficient, for the interpretation of lymph node biopsies. Immunophenotypic and genetic studies are often required for the diagnosis and classification of a hematopoietic neoplasm. Adequate fixation and timely and appropriate technical handling of lymph nodes are, therefore, even more important than with other specimens.

Keywords

Gene Rearrangement Surgical Pathology Roswell Park Memorial Institute Medium Hematopoietic Neoplasm Adequate Fixation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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