Uterus, Cervix, and Vagina

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

Cervical and vaginal biopsies consist of an epithelial surface and varying amounts of underlying stroma. Usually, no grossly identifiable lesion can be seen. The most important objectives are to orient the specimen so that perpendicular sections will be taken through the surface and to secure the specimen properly to ensure that small pieces are not lost. These tasks can be accomplished in several ways. If the specimen is large enough (i.e., greater than 0.4 cm), the tissue can be bisected perpendicular to the surface and marked with either mercurochrome or tattoo powder to indicate the surface to be cut. If the specimen is small, it can be secured between Gelfoam sponges, within fine-mesh biopsy bags, or it can be wrapped in tissue paper. The gynecologist may also submit the biopsy oriented mucosal side up on a mounting surface such as filter paper. In this case, instruct your histotechnologist to embed and cut the biopsy specimen perpendicular to the mounting surface. All biopsy specimens should be entirely submitted, and it is often useful to routinely request that multiple levels be performed by the histology laboratory.

Keywords

Endometrial Cancer Radical Hysterectomy Pelvic Exenteration Cervical Canal Vaginal Cuff 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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