Breast

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

A wide variety of surgical techniques are employed to biopsy or resect breast tissue. In general, these specimens can be divided into three groups: (1) small biopsies for mammographic abnormalities; (2) larger biopsies or lumpectomies; and (3) mastectomies with or without a lymph node dissection. Regardless of the type of specimen, remember that all breast tissue, even if removed for cosmetic reasons, should be examined when it is fresh.

Keywords

Outer Quadrant Receptor Analysis Mammographic Abnormality Complete Axillary Dissection Biopsy Cavity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology. Immediate management of mammographically detected breast lesions. Am J Surg Pathol. 1993; 17 (8): 850–851.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Azzopardi JG, Ahmed A, Millis RR. Problems in breast pathology. In: Bennington JL, ed. Major Problems in Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders Co; 1979; 2: 1.Google Scholar
  3. Carey K. Board OKs health reform policy, breast implant protocol. CAP Today. 1994; 8: 26–28.Google Scholar
  4. Murad TM. What to expect from the pathology report concerning breast tumors. Ala J Med Sci. 1975; 12: 222–224.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. National Cancer Institute. Standardized management of breast specimens. Am J Clin Pathol. 1978; 60: 789–798.Google Scholar
  6. Schnitt SJ, Connolly JL. Processing and evaluation of breast excision specimens: a clinically oriented approach. Am J Clin Pathol. 1992; 98: 125–137.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

Personalised recommendations