Bone Cement, Part 1

Biopolymer for Avulsive Maxillofacial Repair
  • Joseph D. Gresser
  • Debra J. Trantolo
  • Hisanori Nagaoka
  • Donald L. Wise
  • David E. Altobelli
  • Michael J. Yaszemski
  • Gary E. Wnek
Chapter

Abstract

Initial feasibility work had been carried out on a material for maxillofacial repair, specifically that associated with avulsive injury (1–3). A composition containing polypropylene fumarate (PPF), an unsaturated crosslinkable polymer made from fumaric acid, one of the Krebs cycle acids, and propylene glycol, a commonly used diluent in parenteral drug formulations, along with benzoyl peroxide, vinyl pyrollidone, and an adsorbable filler (calcium carbonate has primarily been used to date, as well as powdered human bone, as model adsorbable fillers) had been shown to be easily workable by hand, to solidify in ~15 min at physiological temperatures, and to have physical properties suitable for the intended application. Further, an antibiotic, growth factor, and so on, may be incorporated into this formulation and be slowly released at a predesignated rate (4,5). The results obtained with this initial composition suggested that this material was ready for more thorough system formulation, including materials characterization and mechanical testing, both in in vivo and in vitro testing.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Poly Lactic Acid Bone Cement Benzoyl Peroxide Fumaric Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph D. Gresser
  • Debra J. Trantolo
  • Hisanori Nagaoka
  • Donald L. Wise
  • David E. Altobelli
  • Michael J. Yaszemski
  • Gary E. Wnek

There are no affiliations available

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