Advertisement

Fruit Flies pp 455-463 | Cite as

Control of Fruit Flies in the Tropical Regions of Asia

  • S. Vijaysegaran
Conference paper

Abstract

Tropical Asia is an extremely rich center of diversity of fruits with as many as 500 species being recognized. Fruits and vegetables, therefore, are understandably important components of the diet of the people of this region. The average percentage contribution of fruits and vegetables to total dietary energy for the period 1982–84 was 4.3% compared to an average of 4.7% for Australia, New Zealand and Japan in the same period (Singh, 1988). Total production of fruits in developing countries of Asia over the period 1976–86, experienced an average annual growth rate of 4.5% compared to 3.9% for the Asia — Pacific region, 1.4% for the rest of the world and 2% for the whole world (Singh, 1988). Annual earning from the export of fruits and vegetables from several Asian countries contributed significantly to the national economy. Thailand was the largest exporter with annual earnings in 1983 amounting to around US$ 1 billion. Other major exporters were Philippines (US $ 358 million) and India (US $ 240 million) (Singh, 1988).

Keywords

Annual Earning Sterile Insect Technique Methyl Eugenol Protein Bait Cover Spray 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. ACIAR. 1990. Scent of doom for Malaysian fruit flies. Partners in Research for Development, No. 3, April 1990, pp 2–6. ACIAR, Canberra, Australia.Google Scholar
  2. Agrawal, N. and Mathur, Y.K. 1988. The fruit fly problem associated with cultivated crops in India and its control. Proc. 1st Int. Symp. Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  3. Bess, H A., van den Bosch, R., and Haramoto, F.H. 1961. Fruit fly parasites and the activities in Hawaii Proc. Haw. Entomological. Soc. 17: 367–78.Google Scholar
  4. Department of Statistics, Malaysia. 1989. Annual Statistical Bulletin, 1989.Google Scholar
  5. Drew, R.A.I., Courtice, A.C., and Teakle, D.S. 1983. Bacteria as a natural source of food for adult fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae ). Oecologia (Berlin) 60: 279–284.Google Scholar
  6. Drew, R.A.I. 1988. Taxonomic studies on Oriental fruit fly. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. on Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March, 1988, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  7. Drew, R.A.I. and Fay, H.A.C. 1988b. Comparison of the roles of ammonia and bacteria in the attraction of Dacus tryoni (Froggatt) (Queensland fruit fly) to proteinaceous suspensions. J. Plant Prot. Trop. 5: 127–130.Google Scholar
  8. F.A.O. 1986. Report of the expert consultation on progress and problems in controlling fruit fly infestation. RAPA Publication No. 1986 /28, 18 pp.Google Scholar
  9. Georghiou G.P. 1986. Insecticide resistance: the Tephritidae next? Proc. 2nd. Int. Symp. Fruit Flies, 16–21 September, 1986, Crete, Greece. pp. 27–40. Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  10. Hapitan, J.C. Jr and Castillo, B.S. 1976. Commercial mango production in the Philippines. Agric. Publishing Corporation, 35 pp.Google Scholar
  11. Hooper, G.H.S. 1988. Fruit fly control strategies and their implementation in the tropics. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. on Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March, 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  12. Isnadi, S. 1988. The distribution of Dacus spp. in the Indonesian Archipelagos. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March, 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia, (in press).Google Scholar
  13. Meksongsee, B., Liewvanich, A., and Jirasuratana, M. 1988. Fruit flies in Thailand. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  14. Newell, I.M. and Haramoto, F.H. 1968. Biotic factors influencing populations of Dacus dorsalis in Hawaii. Proc. Hawaiian. Entomol. Soc. 20: 81–139.Google Scholar
  15. Palacio, I.P. 1990. Bioecology of Opiine parasitoids of Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). PhD Thesis, University Pertanian Malaysia.Google Scholar
  16. Rejesus, RS., Baltazar, C.R. and Manoto, E.C. 1988. Fruit flies in the Philippines: Current status and future prospects. Proc. 1st Int. Symp. Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March, 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  17. Serit, M., Jaal, Z., and Tan, K.H. 1986. Parasitism of Dacus dorsalis Hendel in a village ecosystem in Tanjung Bunga, Penang, Malaysia. Proc. 2nd. Int. Symp. Fruit Flies, 1621 September, 1986, Crete, Greece, 441–448.Google Scholar
  18. Singh, R.B. 1988. Significance of fruit flies in fruit and vegetable production in the Asia-Pacific region. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. Fruit Flies in the Tropics 14–16 March, 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar
  19. Steiner, L.F. 1952. Fruit fly control in Hawaii with poison bait sprays, containing protein hydrolysates. J. Econ. Ent. 45: 838–843.Google Scholar
  20. Sutantawong, M. 1988. Control of fruit flies Dacus dorsalis Hendel and Dacus correctus (Bezzi) by Sterile insect technique at Antkhang, Chiang Mai. Report of the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (in press).Google Scholar
  21. Vijaysegaran, S. 1984a. Management of fruit flies. Proc. Seminar on Integrated Pest Management in Malaysia, (eds. B.S. Lee and K.L. Heong), 1984. Malaysian Plant Proc. Soc., K. Lumpur, pp: 231–254.Google Scholar
  22. Vijaysegaran, S. 1984b. The occurrence of Oriental fruit fly on starfruit in Serdang and the status of its parasitoids. J. Plant Protection in the Tropics, 1 (2): 93–98.Google Scholar
  23. Vijaysegaran, 1989. An improved technique for fruit fly control in carambola cultivation using spot sprays of protein baits. National Seminar on Carambola: Developments and Prospects, 18–19 July 1989, K. Lumpur, Malaysia.Google Scholar
  24. Vijaysegaran, S., Lum, K.Y., Drew, RA.I., and Allwood, A.J. 1990. Attractancy of microorganisms isolated from the crop and mid-gut of fruit flies (Tephritidae: Diptera) to fruit flies in the field. 3rd. Int. Conf. Plant Protection in the Tropics, 2023 March, 1990, Genting Highlands, Malaysia.Google Scholar
  25. Yang, Ping-Jun 1988. Status of fruit fly research in China. Proc. 1st. Int. Symp. on Fruit Flies in the Tropics, 14–16 March. 1988, K. Lumpur, Malaysia (in press).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Vijaysegaran

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations