Abstract

The first chapter of this book attempts to provide a perspective of manufacturing issues, particularly from an economic point of view, and to establish a framework to aid decision making in manufacturing. For such a framework to be implemented in detail, two major challenges must be met: first, scientifically sound definitions of relevant manufacturing attributes must be settled upon. This will enable the trade-offs between attributes to be quantitatively assessed in the decision making process. The second challenge, which is directed in particular to the engineering community, is to develop technoeconomical models which allow the decision making process to be scientifically executed. Engineering science has made progress in terms of rigorously analyzing many engineering problems, but often these analyses are not performed in the context of relevant manufacturing attributes, and as such remain purely academic exercises which cannot be effectively utilized in industrial manufacturing practice.

Keywords

Manufacturing System Transfer Line Flexible Manufacture System Part Type Gross National Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Chryssolouris
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Manufacturing and ProductivityMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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