The Prokaryotes pp 4068-4081 | Cite as

The L-Forms of Bacteria

  • Sarabelle Madoff
  • John W. Lawson

Abstract

It is clearly established that many or possibly all bacteria can produce L-forms as a result of the complete or partial inhibition of cell wall synthesis. The resultant wall-deficient organisms (L-forms) lack the classical bacterial structure; in culture they manifest a distinctly variant type of independent growth. Under certain conditions, L-forms have the potential to revert to the parent bacterial form.

Keywords

Bacillus Licheniformis Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Cell Wall Synthesis Neisseria Meningitidis Bovine Mastitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarabelle Madoff
  • John W. Lawson

There are no affiliations available

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