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The Prokaryotes pp 4050-4067 | Cite as

Mycoplasma-Like Organisms—Plant and Invertebrate Pathogens

  • Bruce C. Kirkpatrick

Abstract

Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLOs) are wall-less prokaryotes that cause disease in many higher plants and in some cases in the insects that transmit them. Although MLOs morphologically resemble culturable members of the class Mollicutes and are susceptible to the same antibiotics, the inability to continuously culture these organisms in vitro has prevented their definitive classification as Mollicutes (Razin and Freundt, 1984). However, recent sequence analysis of MLO 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has clearly established that these pathogens form a unique cluster of organisms that are phylogenetically related to Gram-positive bacteria and to culturable mollicutes. These results, and rapid advancements in MLO taxonomy made possible by serological and nucleic acid hybridization analyses, suggest molecular analyses will generate the most important criteria for classifying currently nonculturable wall-less prokaryotes.

Keywords

Insect Vector Aster Yellow Potato Witch Mycoplasmalike Organism Culturable Mycoplasma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

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  • Bruce C. Kirkpatrick

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