Social and Psychological Characteristics of Older Persons

  • Bernice L. Neugarten

Abstract

Long life is a major achievement of the 20th century in all developed countries of the world. The average life expectancy at birth in United States has now reached 75 years, and it is expected to keep rising (Table 3.1.). It is not only that people are living longer. Primarily because of lower birth rates, the proportions of older to younger people are increasing, producing a shift in the overall age distribution of the society that is expressed by the term, the aging society.

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Psychological Characteristic Aging Society Psychological Issue Social Security Benefit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernice L. Neugarten

There are no affiliations available

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