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Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Hypertension: A Study of 1,002 Patients

  • B. S. I. Montgomery
  • R. S. Cole
  • M. G. Warden
  • E. L. H. Palfrey
  • K. E. D. Shuttleworth

Abstract

Changes in blood pressure and the incidence of hypertension were studied in 725 patients, 29.1 months after renal extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL*). The pre-ESWL incidence of hypertension was 19.3%, and there was no change after treatment in anti-hypertensive requirements. There was no significant change in systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressure. Postoperatively, 6% of 585 normotensive patients required treatment for hypertension, and 2.9% have unconfirmed hypertension. The incidence of post-ESWL hypertension in patients with pre-ESWL diastolic pressures less than 90 mmHg is greater than that predicted by data from a population not exposed to ESWL.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. S. I. Montgomery
    • 1
  • R. S. Cole
    • 1
  • M. G. Warden
    • 1
  • E. L. H. Palfrey
    • 1
  • K. E. D. Shuttleworth
    • 1
  1. 1.The Lithotripter CentreSt. Thomas’ HospitalLondonEngland

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