Nephrotoxicity pp 617-622 | Cite as

Lipid Peroxidation as a Possible Cause of Ochratoxin a Toxicity

  • A. D. Rahimtula
  • M. Castegnaro
  • J. C. Bereziat
  • V. Bussachini-Griot
  • L. Broussole
  • J. Michelon
  • H. Bartsch

Abstract

Ochratoxin A (OA), a dihydroisocoumarin containing mycotoxin, is a widespread natural contaminant of a variety of food and feedstuffs at levels ranging from 9–27500 ug/kg (1). Ingestion of OA has been shown to induce nephropathy in several species (1) while dietary feeding induced renal adenomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in mice (2). OA did not produce genetic or related effects in a variety of in vitro, short termtests, but it has been shown to induce single strand breaks in DNA of liver, kidney and spleen (3). OA is suspected of being the main aetiologic agent responsible for Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and associated urinary tract tumours, diseases which affect multiple members of families residing in restricted areas of Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and Romania (1).

Keywords

Lipid Peroxidation Extensive Metabolizers Balkan Endemic Nephropathy Microsomal Lipid Peroxidation IARC Scientific Publication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Rahimtula
    • 1
  • M. Castegnaro
    • 1
  • J. C. Bereziat
    • 1
  • V. Bussachini-Griot
    • 1
  • L. Broussole
    • 1
  • J. Michelon
    • 1
  • H. Bartsch
    • 1
  1. 1.International Agency for Research on CancerLyon Cedex 08France

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