Nephrotoxicity pp 719-723 | Cite as

Characterization of Isolated Renal Proximal Tubules for Nephrotoxicity Studies

  • Carol E. Green
  • Jack E. Dabbs
  • Katherine L. Allen
  • Charles A. Tyson
  • Elmer J. Rauckman

Abstract

Isolated tubule or cell suspensions offer an important way of studying the mechanisms of nephrotoxicity in vitro, and screening novel compounds for their potential adverse affects on the kidney. The major drawback, however, appeared to be the short in vitro lifespan of isolated tubules prepared by any technique. In general, most investigators limit incubations to no more than 1 or 2 hr because of loss of viability and functional capabilities. Ormstad (1984) reported rapid loss of viability of isolated renal tubules and cells, where greater than 25% of the cellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leaked to the medium in 1.5 to 2 hr of incubation. Obatomi and Plummer (1986) observed a 40% loss in tubule cell viability during 3-hr incubations of rat proximal tubules. Loss of renal functional capabilities, such as O2 consumption, has also been reported for isolated tubules (Harris et al., 1981).

Keywords

Proximal Tubule Renal Proximal Tubule Ethacrynic Acid Collagenase Perfusion Tubule Fragment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol E. Green
    • 1
  • Jack E. Dabbs
    • 1
  • Katherine L. Allen
    • 1
  • Charles A. Tyson
    • 1
  • Elmer J. Rauckman
    • 2
  1. 1.Target Organ Toxicity DepartmentSRI InternationalMenlo ParkUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Environmental Health SciencesResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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