Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Renal Calculi: Effect of Shock Wave Exposure on Renal Function Evaluated by 99mTc-DTPA Renogram

  • Taketoshi Kishimoto
  • H. Iimori
  • M. Senju
  • K. Yamamoto
  • T. Sugimoto
  • M. Maekawa
  • H. Ochi

Abstract

The effect of shock wave exposure on renal function in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated by renogram using 99mTc-DTPA in 21 patients having kidney stones. An analysis of the early phase (vascular phase) showed a significant prolongation in the time required to reach the peak (Tmax) after ESWL treatment in both the affected and contralateral kidneys (p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in the maximum activity between the two kidneys before and after ESWL. In the whole renogram, although Tmax and maximum activity were not affected as much, the time required to reach half of the peak (T-1/2) was prolonged after ESWL treatment in the affected kidney. These findings suggest that transient functional changes develop after ESWL treatment in both the treated and untreated kidneys, and that tubular function is more affected in the treated kidney.

Keywords

Shock Wave Renal Blood Flow Shock Wave Lithotripsy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Contralateral Kidney 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taketoshi Kishimoto
    • 1
  • H. Iimori
    • 1
  • M. Senju
    • 1
  • K. Yamamoto
    • 1
  • T. Sugimoto
    • 1
  • M. Maekawa
    • 1
  • H. Ochi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of UrologyOsaka City University Medical SchoolOsaka, 545Japan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyOsaka City University Medical SchoolOsakaJapan

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