Measurement of the Energy Content in Acousto-Ultrasonic Signals

  • M. J. Sundaresan
  • E. G. HennekeII

Abstract

Important features of the techniques currently employed for the measurement of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) parameter commonly referred to as stress wave factor are briefly described. An alternate procedure for characterizing this AU parameter, in which the energy content of the received signal is used to rank the material’s interaction with the propagating stress wave is proposed. This procedure employs simultaneous counting of acousto-ultrasonic signals at a number of threshold levels, suitably distributed across the amplitude range of the signals encountered in a particular test. The resulting counts at different threshold levels are given weightings according to their amplitudes and are summed up to provide a measure of energy. The accuracy of this scheme is verified by measuring the acoustical signals produced by the impact of steel spheres of different masses on a borosilicate glass block. In a related study, the same procedure was applied to measure acoustic emission signals from composite materials and was found to provide an estimate of the damage level with fair degree of success.

Keywords

Acoustic Emission Stress Wave Acoustic Emission Signal Steel Sphere Total Energy Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Sundaresan
    • 1
  • E. G. HennekeII
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Response GroupVirginia TechBlacksburgUSA

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