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Statistical Evaluation of Quality in Composites Using the Stress Wave Factor Technique

  • A. Madhav
  • J. A. Nachlas

Abstract

The growth in the extent of applications of composite materials, particularly in commercial products, has been dramatic and carries an implied mandate for effective methods for material quality evaluation. The cost of composite materials dictates that nondestructive test methods be used. At the same time, the nature of composites limits the use of conventional techniques such as radiography, eddy-current or ultrasonics. Recently, a new technique known as the Stress Wave Factor (SWF) technique, has been developed and appears to hold promise as a method for the evaluation of composite material quality.

Implementation of the SWF method is examined using the zeroth moment method suggested by Talreja et. al.6 The behavior of the response to specimens of known quality is investigated statistically. It is found that the transformed/actual readings follow a Beta distribution and that specimens of different quality are readily distinguishable using the statistical analysis of the SWF response. Reasonable future steps for translating these findings into efficient quality evaluation methods are suggested.

Keywords

Beta Distribution Cumulative Distribution Frequency Zeroth Moment Recei Ving Transducer Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Madhav
    • 1
  • J. A. Nachlas
    • 2
  1. 1.Engineering Science and MechanicsUSA
  2. 2.Industrial Engineering and Operations ResearchVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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