Calibrating Ocean Models by the Constrained Inverse Method

  • Berrien MooreIII
  • Anders Björkström

Abstract

From the results of several investigations (Keeling 1973; Björkström 1980; Killough and Emanuel 1981; Björkström, this volume; Bolin 1983; Bolin et al. 1983, p. 231; Fiadeiro 1983; Bolin, this volume) the approach of using highly aggregated box models (less than 15 boxes for the world oceans) appears to be inadequate for the task of estimating accurately the current rate at which the ocean is absorbing excess atmospheric CO2. However, general circulation models of the entire ocean are not at hand; therefore, what is needed is a new generation of models that can serve usefully in the interim to study the important question of the current rate of oceanic CO2 uptake. Further, such models may have other applications, not the least of which may be their use as diagnostic tools for general circulation models of the ocean (see also Bryan et al. 1975; Sarmiento, this volume).

Keywords

Atlantic Ocean Arctic Ocean Ocean Model Density Layer Reference Case 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Berrien MooreIII
  • Anders Björkström

There are no affiliations available

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