Designing and Adapting Instruments for a Cross-Cultural Study on Migration and Mental Health in Peru

  • F. Moises Gaviria
  • Dev. S. Pathak
  • Joseph Flaherty
  • Carlos Garcia Pacheco
  • Hector Martinez
  • Ronald Wintrob
  • Timothy Mitchell

Abstract

Methods to make measurement both valid and reliable in trans—cultural settings are exemplified from a study conducted in Peru to examine the impact of the migratory process from a rural village in the Andes to Lima, a metropolitan urban area. The purpose of the paper is to describe the results of design, selection and/or cultural adaptation of six instruments used in the project. A taxonomy of issues in adapting instruments for cross-cultural equivalence is presented, and the procedures used to address issues involved in cross-cultural applicability of the instruments selected for the study are provided.

Keywords

Cultural Adaptation Cultural Setting Rural Village Team Evaluation Research Diagnostic Criterion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Moises Gaviria
    • 1
  • Dev. S. Pathak
    • 1
  • Joseph Flaherty
    • 1
  • Carlos Garcia Pacheco
    • 1
  • Hector Martinez
    • 1
  • Ronald Wintrob
    • 1
  • Timothy Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Medicine, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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