Exercise and Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Elderly

  • Nanette K. Wenger
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 31)

Abstract

The altered functional status of the elderly cardiac patient reflects both the anatomic and physiologic cardiovascular changes that occur with aging and the dysfunction resulting from the specific cardiovascular disorder or disorders [1]. The changes of aging decrease the reserve capacity of the heart; problems become manifest at times of cardiovascular stress, as occurs with disease. Both must be considered in making activity recommendations for the elderly patient, and variable components of both these limitations are amenable to therapeutic intervention. Additionally, cardiac disease in the elderly rarely occurs in isolation; there are typically additive effects of other systemic illnesses that may directly or indirectly impair cardiovascular performance. The rehabilitative approach must encompass the combination of medical, psychological, and social problems encountered in the elderly patient with multisystem degenerative disease.

Keywords

Cardiac Output Stroke Volume Exercise Training Cardiac Rehabilitation Aerobic Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nanette K. Wenger

There are no affiliations available

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