Progression and Regression of Nonhuman Primate Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis: Considerations of Experimental Design

  • Thomas B. Clarkson

Abstract

In 1968, Dr. Gardner McMillan of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute called to the attention of the atherosclerosis research community that only 3% of the atherosclerosis studies supported by their Institute dealt with regression of atherosclerosis. Two years later, Armstrong and his co-workers described the regression that occurred in diet-induced coronary artery atherosclerosis of rhesus monkeys when the diet was changed from one high in cholesterol to one devoid of cholesterol.1 The recognition that atherosclerosis regression was an understudied area, the promising results of Armstrong and his co-workers and the public health importance of atherosclerosis regression together stimulated over the past decade vigorous research on regression.

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Lumen Area Plaque Size Internal Elastic Lamina Atherogenic Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas B. Clarkson
    • 1
  1. 1.Arteriosclerosis Research Center, Bowman Gray School of MedicineWake Forest UniversityWinston-SalemUSA

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