Interaction of Therapeutic Diets and Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs in Regression Studies in Animals

  • Robert W. Wissler
  • Dragoslava Vesselinovitch

Abstract

The evidence for regression of the atherosclerotic plaque comes largely from three types of studies. These include older epidemiological and pathological studies of human disease, recent animal model investigations, and a number of recent and current pioneering studies in man in which sequential angiography was used as the major endpoint.

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Atherosclerotic Lesion Cynomolgus Monkey Coronary Artery Lesion ATHEROGENIC Diet 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert W. Wissler
    • 1
  • Dragoslava Vesselinovitch
    • 1
  1. 1.The Department of Pathology and The Specialized Center of Research on AtherosclerosisThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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