Critical Review Powder Metallurgy of Titanium

  • V. S. Arunachalam

Abstract

Powder metallurgy offers an attractive alternate strategy for producing titanium parts. The advantages include an efficient material utilization, near-net shape products with better mechanical properties. It is not without significance that the initial pioneering experiments by the U.S. Bureau of Mines were first in producing titanium powder compacts. Interstitial pick-up encountered during reduction prevented the exploitation of the powder route. Early experiments on the production of titanium powder during the metal reduction stage itself were carried out in the Soviet Union using the calcium hydride process. These efforts were only marginally successful because of impurity pick-up during reduction. More than anything else, non-availability of a good quality powder is responsible for titanium powder metallurgy remaining dormant for a number of years.

Keywords

Powder Metallurgy Titanium Powder Titanium Hydride Centrifugal Atomization Powder Preform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. S. Arunachalam
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Metallurgical Research LaboratoryHyderabadIndia

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