The Genetics of Other Intemperate Bacteriophages

  • Edward A. Birge
Part of the Springer Series in Microbiology book series (SSMIC)

Abstract

Bacteriophage T4 has probably been the most intensively investigated intemperate virus, but there are many other viruses which have also been the subject of considerable study. In this chapter, descriptions of selected bacteriophages are presented to illustrate the high degree of genetic diversity available to the bacterial geneticist, and to provide comparisons of these different phages to each other and to T4. In order to facilitate these comparisons, the physical properties of each phage discussed in this chapter are summarized in Table 5–1.

Keywords

Minus Strand Tail Fiber Late mRNA Hydroxymethyl Uracil Parental Strand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

General

  1. Denhardt, D.T. 1977. The isometric single-stranded DNA phages, pp. 1–104. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R., (eds.) Comprehensive Virology, vol. 7. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Denhardt, D.T., Dressler, D., Ray, D.S. (eds.) 1978. The Single-stranded DNA phages. Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.Google Scholar
  3. Eiserling, F.A. 1979. Bacteriophage structure, pp. 543–580. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R., (eds.) Comprehensive Virology, vol. 13. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  4. Fiers, W. 1979. Structure and function of RNA bacteriophages, pp. 69–204. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R., (eds.) Comprehensive Virology, vol. 13. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  5. Hausmann, R. 1977. Bacteriophage T7 genetics. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology 75:77–110.Google Scholar
  6. Hemphill, H.E., Whiteley, H.R. 1975. Bacteriophages of Bacillus subtilis. Bacteriological Reviews 39:257–315.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Holloway, B.W., Krishnapillai, V. 1975. Bacteriophages and bacteriocins, pp. 99–132. In: Clarke, P.H., Richmond, M.H., (eds.) Genetics and Biochemistry of Pseudomonas. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  8. Lomovskaya, N.D., Chater, K.F., Mkrtumian, N.M. 1980. Genetics and molecular biology of Streptomyces bacteriophages. Microbiological Reviews 44:206–229.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Mathews, C.K. 1977. Reproduction of large virulent bacteriophages, pp. 179–294. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R., (eds.) Comprehensive Virology, vol. 7. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ray, D.S. 1977. Replication of filamentous bacteriophages, pp. 105–178. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R., (eds.) Comprehensive Virology, vol. 7. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Strauss, E.G., Strauss, J.H. 1974. Bacterial viruses of genetic interest, pp. 259–269. In: King, R.C., (ed.) Handbook of Genetics, vol. 1. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  12. Williams, R.C., Fisher, H.W. 1974. An Electron Micrographic Atlas of Viruses. Springfield, Il.: Thomas.Google Scholar
  13. Wood, W.B., King, J. 1979. Genetic control of complex bacteriophage assembly, pp. 581–633. In: Fraenkel-Conrat, H., Wagner, R.R. (eds.). Comprehensive Virology, vol. 13. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar

Specialized

  1. Barrell, B.G., Air, G.M., Hutchison, C.A., III. 1976. Overlapping genes in bacteriophage ∅X 174. Nature 264:34–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Beremand, M.N., Blumenthal, T. 1979. Overlapping genes in RNA phage: a new protein implicated in lysis. Cell 18:257–266.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Blumenthal, T., Carmichael, G.G. 1979. RNA replication: function and structure of Qß-replicase. Annual Review of Biochemistry 48:525–548.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fiers, W., Contreras, R., Duerinck, F., Haegeman, G., Iserentant, D., Merregaert, J., Min Jou, W., Molemans, F., Raeymaekers, A., Van den Berghe, A., Volckaert, G., Ysebaert, M. 1976. Complete nucleotide sequence of bacteriophage MS2 RNA: primary and secondary structure of the replicase gene. Nature 260: 500–507.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Keegstra, W., Baas, P.D., Jansz, H.S. 1979. Bacteriophage ∅X 174 RF DNA replication in vivo. A study by electron microscopy. Journal of Molecular Biology 135:69–89.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kim, J.-S., Davidson, N. 1974. Electron microscope heteroduplex study of sequence relations of T2, T4, and T6 bacteriophage DNAs. Virology 57:93–111.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Matthes, M., Denhardt, D.T. 1980. The mechanism of replication of ∅X 174 DNA. XVI. Evidence that the ∅X 174 viral strand is synthesized discontinuously. Journal of Molecular Biology 136:45–63.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mellado, R.P., Peñalva, M.A., Inciarte, M.R., Salas, M. 1980. The protein covalently linked to the 5′ termini of the DNA of B. subtilis phage ∅29 is involved in the initiation of DNA replication. Virology 104:84–96.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Studier, F.W., Dunn, J.J., Buzash-Pollert, E. 1979. Processing of bacteriophage T7 RNAs by RNaseIII, pp. 261–268. In: Russell, T.R., Brew, K., Faber, H., Schultz, J. (eds.) From Gene to Protein: Information Transfer in Normal and Abnormal Cells. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  10. Tessman, E.S., Tessman, I., Pollock, T.J. 1980. Gene K of bacteriophage ∅X174 codes for a nonessential protein. Journal of Virology 33:557–560.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward A. Birge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany and MicrobiologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

Personalised recommendations