Repair and Recombination of DNA Molecules

  • Edward A. Birge
Part of the Springer Series in Microbiology book series (SSMIC)

Abstract

Every organism has mechanisms for maintaining the integrity of its nucleic acid (i.e., for repairing any damage). Nevertheless, most organisms, including even the bacteria and viruses, exhibit some sort of genetic exchange. The two processes may seem antithetical, since recombination, the movement of genetic information from one molecule of nucleic acid to another, implies that the nucleic acid undergoes some kind of structural alteration. However, as will be discussed in this chapter, many of the steps involved in the completion of the recombination process are the same as those involved in repair, and recombination can be looked on as a process in which the potential for damage to the nucleic acid is outweighed by the potential benefit to be derived from the new genetic information.

Keywords

recA Protein Cold Spring Harbor Symposium lexA Protein Branch Migration Superhelical Turn 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward A. Birge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Botany and MicrobiologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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