A New Approach for Clinical Study of Control of Respiration

  • J. Milic-Emili
  • M. Aubier
  • A. Grassino
  • J.-Ph. Derenne
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (EMISS, volume 3)

Abstract

Most acute and chronic lung diseases are accompanied by hyperventilation, usually in the form of rapid, shallow breathing. This pattern occurs in patients with acute pulmonary vascular congestion and edema, and has been linked with increased J-receptors discharge.1,2 However, CO2 retention in acute pulmonary edema is not uncommon. The reasons why some patients with edema develop CO2 retention are not clear. Arterial PCO2 was found not to be correlated with roentgenographic abnormality, PaO2, or survival.3 Further, CO2 retention was not related to the ventilatory response to CO2 measured after the edema had resolved.4 In chronic pulmonary congestion due to mitral stenosis resting ventilation is high and PaCO2 low, while the ventilatory response to CO2 is lower than normal.5 After corrective surgery, resting ventilation in two patients with mitral stenosis decreased and the ventilatory response to CO2 increased.5 It is not known whether lung function tests improved following surgery.

Keywords

Residual Volume Mitral Stenosis Ventilatory Response Total Lung Capacity Inspiratory Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Milic-Emili
    • 1
  • M. Aubier
    • 1
  • A. Grassino
    • 1
  • J.-Ph. Derenne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Meakins Christie LaboratoriesMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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