Passive Detectors

  • Ralph H. Thomas
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (EMISS, volume 2)

Abstract

In this lecture I shall interpret the term “passive” radiation detector as meaning one that will yield up its information after an irradiation is completed, and often only after some processing of the detector to obtain the data or some considerable data processing. Examples of such detectors would thus be:
  1. (1)

    Nuclear Emulsion.

     
  2. (2)

    Activation Detectors (often imprecisely referred to as threshold detectors).

     
  3. (3)

    Integrating Ionization Chambers.

     
  4. (4)

    Thermoluminescent Dosimeters.

     

Keywords

Neutron Spectrum Glow Curve Nuclear Emulsion Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Thermoluminescent Dosimeter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Thomas
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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